#AppleToo

What Was AppleToo?

A group of Apple workers joined together to “organize and protect” themselves. They asked fellow Apple workers who wanted to see real change at Apple to share their stories.

They stated that when stories are collected and presented together, they help expose persistent patterns of racism, sexism, inequity, discrimination, intimidation, suppression, coercion, abuse, unfair punishment, and unchecked privilege.

Here is the mission statement that belonged to #AppleToo:

For too long, Apple has evaded public scrutiny. The truth is that for many Apple workers — a reality faced disproportionately by our Black, Indigenous, and other colleagues from minoritized racial, gender, and historically marginalized groups of people — the culture of secrecy creates an opaque, intimidating fortress. When we press for accountability and redress to the persistent injustices we witness or experience in our workplace, we are faced with a pattern of isolation, degradation, and gaslighting.

No more. We’ve exhausted all internal avenues. We’ve talked with our leadership. We’ve gone to the People team. We’ve escalated through Business Conduct. Nothing has changed.

It’s time to Think Different.

Know The Laws

Congress enacted the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) in 1935 to protect the rights of employees and employers, to encourage collective bargaining, and to curtail certain private sector labor and management practices, which can harm the general welfare of workers, businesses and the U.S. economy.

National Labor Relations Board

You have the right to act with coworkers to address work-related issues in many ways. Examples include: talking with one or more co-workers about your wages and benefits or other working conditions, circulating a petition asking for better hours, participating in a concerted refusal to work in unsafe conditions, and joining with coworkers to talk directly to your employer, to a government agency, or to the media about problems in your workplace. Your employer cannot discharge, discipline, or threaten you for, or coercively question you about, this “protected concerted” activity.

National Labor Relations Board

The purpose behind pursuing systemic enforcement is to dismantle the pattern, practice or policy that results in or facilitates decisions that are discriminatory. While systemic discrimination can affect significant numbers of employees or applicants, it can also impact small numbers as well.

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

The EEO laws prohibit punishing job applicants or employees for asserting their rights to be free from employment discrimination including harassment. Asserting these EEO rights is called “protected activity,” and it can take many forms.

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

California law (called the Fair Employment and Housing Act or FEHA) prohibits discrimination, harassment and retaliation. The law also requires that employers “take reasonable steps to prevent and correct wrongful (harassing, discriminatory, retaliatory) behavior in the workplace (Cal. Govt. Code §12940(k)).

The Department of Fair Employment and Housing

Related Pages

The Future

Follow the movement on Twitter: @AppleLaborers